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Title: Newest Album in Top 300
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SinterKlaus
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(Date Posted:11/01/2017 12:25)

Chip, just curious - which album in your top 300 was initially released most recently.  New Xmas albums are released every year - do they ever crack your top 300 list or do you cut it off at a certain year (and when did the golden age of Xmas music end?)
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RE:Newest Album in Top 300
(Date Posted:11/02/2017 01:17)


Tom,

The Golden Age of Christmas music was from the early 1950s, thru the entire decade of the 1960s, and then ending in the early 1970s.

And no, I have no date restrictions on what albums can enter my
Top 500. The problem is simply that new Christmas albums past this time period, with very few exceptions, just can't compare.

If you want a good example of one of those aforementioned rare exceptions that made it, it's Richard Clayderman's 1985 Christmas album, A Romantic Christmas, which comes in at #157.


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CluelessInSeattle
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RE:Newest Album in Top 300
(Date Posted:11/11/2017 22:15)

Gee, what about the 40s when I was a kid?   Bing Crosby's "White Christmas, Nat King Cole's "Christmas Song" and Judy Garland's "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" seem to me like they are what kicked off the golden age of popular recorded Christmas music.  Do you exclude the 40s because of the limitations of the recording technology back in those days?
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RE:Newest Album in Top 300
(Date Posted:11/12/2017 01:44)


Just like the Golden Age of Hollywood (for movies), the Golden Age of Christmas music, or any Golden Age for that matter, does NOT mean there are not examples/exceptions before or after the generally acknowledged time frame of their respective Golden Age periods. Good golly, I really didn't think I even had to point that out; I would have thought it would be assumed.

And no, I do not exclude the 1940s because of the limitations of the "recording technology." I exclude it because outside of a very few examples, there was practically nothing.

What's more, even the examples that you mentioned, with the lone exception of Bing Crosby, don't qualify. Nat King Cole's classic version of 'The Christmas Song" was not the 1946 version (which wasn't even released on a full-length Christmas album), but rather the 1961 version he did with Ralph Carmichael. That's the version most well-known and loved today. As for Judy Garland, she never in her career even released a Christmas album. But what's more, her original version of "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas" was not recorded for release on record, but rather for the classic film Meet Me In St. Louis.

In addition, even the 1940s Christmas recordings of two of the titans of the genre, Fred Waring and Robert Shaw, were primitive (a word Shaw used himself in an interview) original versions of their later re-recordings in the 1950s.

So emphatically no, the 1940s are categorically not a part of the period of what is regarded as the Golden Age of Christmas music.



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CluelessInSeattle
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RE:Newest Album in Top 300
(Date Posted:11/12/2017 12:03)

Thanks, Chip.

So then,  could those 1940s Christmas albums of 78 rpm recordings, like Robert Shaw's Christmas Hymns and Carols or Bing Crosby's Merry Christmas be regarded as the  precursors or harbingers of the Golden Age of Christmas Music?  Perhaps The Bronze Age of Christmas Music?  ;-)


(Message edited by CluelessInSeattle On 11/12/2017 14:13)
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RE:Newest Album in Top 300
(Date Posted:11/12/2017 22:20)


The 1940s were basically the "Dawn of the Golden Age of Christmas music." And y
es, these 1940s releases (on 78s, 45s and 10" LPs) were indeed precursors to their later classic 12" LP incarnations.

Fred Waring and Robert Shaw re-recorded all of their 1940s tracks in the '50s (Waring again in mono in 1954 and 1955 for his 1955 12" LP version of 'Twas The Night Before Christmas; and Shaw in stereo in 1957 for his 1958 12" LP version of Christmas Hymns And Carols, Volume 1). As for Bing Crosby's Merry Christmas album, the 1955 12" LP version contained four new songs that were recorded in the early '50s, and the other eight songs were retained from the '40s.


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