User Name  Password
Remove ads



Today | Join | Member | Search | Who's On | Chat Room | Help | Shop | Sign In | | | | Follow Aimoo_Com on Twitter
Title: What is?
Hop to: 
Views:1024     
New Topic New Poll
<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
AuthorComment
ElJefe1
 Author    



Posts: 4

(Date Posted:08/10/2004 23:49)
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo

I have a KOCH 21 button melodeon.  I believe it to be German, over 65 years old.  It seems to be in excellent condition and all notes play but I dont know how accurately.  I have researched but have been unable to find reference to KOCH.  I did see a Hohner that looked similar.  On the front and back of the top box is a circlular trade mark with a goat atop a crag.  Below that reads KOCH and below that reads HARMONICA.  I know this is not a harmonica.  On one end is a metal plate that reads Stahlstimmen.  Can anyone provide any information about it?
usertype:3
Theo Gibb
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 1# 



Posts:762
From: Great_britain


(Date Posted:09/10/2004 01:52)

Hello ElJefe1

I think that Koch was one of several firms that merged early in the 20th century to form the company that is now Hohner. I dont know much more than that, but it does explain the similarity in appearance.

Stahlstimmen is German for steel reeds. At that time most melodeons were made with brass reeds. steel was a big improvement because the reeds were louder, held their tuning better, and tended not to braek so easily. Manufactureres were therfore keen to publicise the better material.

Harmonica is the German name for the instrument we call a melodeon, sometimes also handharmonica to distinguish it from mundharmonica, literally "mouth harmonica" which we would recognise as a harmonicaor mouthorgan.

Its a nice piece of history, and probably capable of playing reasonably well. How does it sound? Any wheezes, buzzing noises etc? you can easily check the tuning. Its quite likely to be flat compared to modern pits of A=440. A lot of older German boxes were tuned to A=435.

Theo
usertype:1 tt= 0
Support us

Create free forum and click the links below and your donations will make a difference here.

www.dinodirect.com

A Huge Online Store for Various Cool Gadgets, Accessories: Laser Pointer, Bluetooth Headset, Cell Phone Jammer, MP3 Players, Spy Cameras, Soccer Jersey, Window Curtains, MP4 Player, E Cigarette, Wedding Dresses, Hearing Aids, eBook Reader, Tattoo Machines, LED Light Bulbs, Bluetooth Stereo Headset, Holiday Gifts, Security Camera and Games Accessories and Hobby Gadgets.  
ElJefe1
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 2# 



Posts:4


(Date Posted:10/10/2004 08:10)

Reply to : Theo Gibb

Thank you for your prompt reply.

I'm not at all musical but I can tell you that all the notes 'sound' good, that is no grunts or wheezes.  They sound like the notes on related music that I have heard.  I removed the end and see that all the reeds are bright and shiny.  Interior of instrument is clean and dry, almost as if new.  The lower strap is broken and the metal grill above the buttons is tarnished.  Polishing and resilvering that would help.  There is some contact wear on the back of the bellows but otherwise I believe the bellows are in excellent condition.  Most of the buttons, ivory I presume, are discolored from use I imagine and can probably be cleaned.  Once I can determine a value I'll probably have it fixed and sold.

usertype:3 tt= 0
ElJefe1
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 3# 



Posts:4


(Date Posted:10/10/2004 09:22)

Reply to : ElJefe1 PS  I found a picture of an almost identical instrument.  Keyboards are the same, including the embossed pattern by buttons.  The grill is identical as are the eye screw at each end.  The top and bottom boxes are different, being identified as KOCH on the upper and with a unique pattern on the lower.  The box with VERDI in the picture is plain on mine but the metal corner pieces are identical.  I hope this helps.


Reply to : Theo GibbThank you for your prompt reply.I'm not at all musical but I can tell you that all the notes 'sound' good, that is no grunts or wheezes. They sound like the notes on related music that I have heard. I removed the end and see that all the reeds are bright and shiny. Interior of instrument is clean and dry, almost as if new. The lower strap is broken and the metal grill above the buttons is tarnished. Polishing and resilvering that would help. There is some contact wear on the back of the bellows but otherwise I believe the bellows are in excellent condition. Most of the buttons, ivory I presume, are discolored from use I imagine and can probably be cleaned. Once I can determine a value I'll probably have it fixed and sold.
usertype:3 tt= 0
ElJefe1
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 4# 



Posts:4


(Date Posted:10/10/2004 09:23)

Reply to : ElJefe1 The site to the picture is http://www.well.com/~jax/rcfb/button_accordion.html

Reply to : ElJefe1 PS I found a picture of an almost identical instrument. Keyboards are the same, including the embossed pattern by buttons. The grill is identical as are the eye screw at each end. The top and bottom boxes are different, being identified as KOCH on the upper and with a unique pattern on the lower. The box with VERDI in the picture is plain on mine but the metal corner pieces are identical. I hope this helps.Reply to : Theo GibbThank you for your prompt reply.I'm not at all musical but I can tell you that all the notes 'sound' good, that is no grunts or wheezes. They sound like the notes on related music that I have heard. I removed the end and see that all the reeds are bright and shiny. Interior of instrument is clean and dry, almost as if new. The lower strap is
usertype:3 tt= 0
GPS
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 5# 




(Date Posted:10/10/2004 19:45)

Reply to : Theo Gibb

Hello ElJefe1I think that Koch was one of several firms that merged early in the 20th century to form the company that is now Hohner.

Quite right; Hohner and Koch both made reed instruments in Trossingen, Germany, at the turn of the 19th/ 20th century and they did indeed join forces fairly early on.  Re the photograph - interestingly, Hohner used the name "Verdi" as a model name in their piano accordion range (probably still do - I don't know a lot about piano boxes) so the Verdi melodeon almost certainly came from the same workshops.  Looks a lot like a proto-pokerwork, doesn't it?

Graham

usertype:5 tt= 0
ElJefe1
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 6# 



Posts:4


(Date Posted:13/10/2004 09:20)

Thanks for all the help.  I feel better now. I suppose that I should attempt to find out the key. 

 

 

Reply to : GPS


Reply to : Theo GibbHello ElJefe1I think that Koch was one of several firms that merged early in the 20th century to form the company that is now Hohner.Quite right; Hohner and Koch both made reed instruments in Trossingen, Germany,at theturn of the 19th/20th century and they did indeed join forces fairly early on. Re the photograph - interestingly, Hohner used the name "Verdi" as a model name in their piano accordion range (probably still do - I don't know a lot about piano boxes) so the Verdi melodeon almost certainly came from the same workshops. Looks a lot like a proto-pokerwork, doesn't it?Graham
usertype:3 tt= 0
<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
New Topic New Poll
Sign Up | Create | About Us | SiteMap | Features | Forums | Show Off | Faq | Help
Copyright © 2000-2014 Aimoo Free Forum All rights reserved.

Get cheapest China Wholesale,  China Wholesale Supplier,  to be a retailer is easy now.
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY